A 16-Year-Old Boy Who Was Convicted Of First-Degree Robbery Attitude of Media and Government Toward Youth Crime

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Attitude of Media and Government Toward Youth Crime

Youth crime in England and Wales is a popular but controversial topic in the media, with eye-catching words like “yob” and “ASBO” regularly appearing in the headlines. In England and Wales, a child is anyone under the age of 18 as defined by law, while a delinquent is anyone between the ages of 10 and 20 who has been convicted of an offense. Most of the crimes reported in the media involving juvenile offenders involved “anti-social behavior, violence, and sometimes even just kids roaming the streets in groups.” Clearly, not all crimes committed by young offenders are of a very serious nature. nature, even if the media tends to sensationalize the crimes they committed. According to data compiled by Crimeinfo, most crimes committed by young men and women do not appear to be serious: “Theft, handling stolen goods, burglary, fraud or forgery and criminal damage accounted for more than 68 percent of youth crime. Crime; in a 2004 Almost eight out of 10 self-reported incidents in the survey were non-serious in nature. The most common crimes were non-injurious assault (28%); sale of non-Class A substances (19%) and theft from the workplace or Schools (16%); when violence does occur, many do not involve harm and are often perpetrated “on the spur of the moment” against someone the young person knows. This usually means fighting (possibly between friends) and Usually occurs around the home in the afternoon; in late December 2005, more children were jailed for robbery than for any other crime; despite media attention on violent crime, there were few warnings or convictions related to violence”.

The UK Government aims to provide every child with the support they need, regardless of their background or circumstances, to ensure their health and safety; enjoyment and achievement; making a positive contribution; and achieving economic wellbeing. In March 2005, England’s first Commissioner for Children was appointed. The commissioner’s mandate is to “gather and present the views of society’s most vulnerable children and young people and will facilitate their participation in the organisation’s work”. In November 2000, UNICEF was launched to address vulnerable children and young people within vulnerable groups. The Crime and Chaos Reduction Partnership, funded by the Home Office, aims to reduce crime. Many other programs such as partnerships to reduce crime and chaos, productive and other priority crime strategies, local agreements, neighborhood policing, etc. are in operation. In March 2006, the Youth Justice Commission published Youth Resettlement – ​​A Framework for Action. The framework focuses on multiple areas and highlights specific issues in the context of youth. The areas covered by the framework are: case management and transition; accommodation; education, training and employment; health; substance abuse; family; finances, benefits and debt.

Paul Omajo Omaji is strongly in favor of restorative justice in place of the retaliatory justice system, which he believes is traditional and outdated. According to him, the traditional justice system is failing to deliver, so a complete overhaul of the justice system may be required in partnership with local institutions.

Recently, the government has introduced a series of interventions to curb crime in the first place. These and other programs like these target a broader group of at-risk children. These include:

Sure Start: Aims to improve the health and wellbeing of families with children under the age of 4 first, ensuring they are ready to thrive when they start school.

On Track: is a small initiative for older children who have been determined to be at risk of being involved in crime.

Communities of Concern: is an evidence-based prevention program delivered by communities in partnership with local agencies.

The Youth Inclusion Program (YIP) targets 50 of the most “at-risk” or “disaffected” 13- to 16-year-olds in the poorest communities.

Safer Schools Partnership (SSP): Having police officers in schools to reduce truancy, crime and victimization among young people, challenge unacceptable behaviour, and provide safe and secure learning environments, and

Youth Inclusion and Support Group (YISP): is a multi-agency group established by the Youth Justice Council to target children at risk of offending and children who have started offending.

David Farrington, professor of psychocriminology at the University of Cambridge, discusses a program that has been very successful in the US and which could also be applied in the UK. The scheme he spoke of was a community care program aimed at reducing anti-social behavior among young people. It was designed by researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle. It can be easily adapted in the UK due to its flexibility and systematic approach. It’s called a “risk and conservation-focused plan” and is based on a social development strategy that can be tailored to the specific needs of a community, region or city. Its features include:

Community mobilization: Key leaders work closely with a governing board made up of local agencies and community representatives. The Board arranges for a detailed assessment of local risks and resources and develops an action plan.

Implementation: Implement techniques from a menu of strategies that research has shown to be effective, aimed at addressing priority risks and protective factors

Evaluation: Detailed monitoring is an inherent part of the program to assess its progress and effectiveness.

There are some mentorship programs that can be very successful but are unfortunately poorly funded. One of the projects aims to reduce the risk of crime among young people in Cambridgeshire. “CSV Cambridge Mentors and Peers’ request for financial support follows national acclaim for one of its sister projects in Essex, which was recently featured in The Independent and BBC1’s Breakfast News programme. The two projects, together with A third project in Upper Bedford aims to reduce the risk of youth delinquency”

Research by the Center for Crime Research at Vauxhall University, Luton, has shown that voluntary mentoring programs involving young offenders can have clear positive effects: “Reduced crime, fewer problems in schools, and young people’s self-confidence, self-esteem and sense of self. Participating Young people highlighted the important value of the ‘volunteer mentor’ role – they said they valued volunteers’ friendship, trust, guidance and encouragement.” The Independent’s editorial spoke eloquently of the mentoring scheme for young people. “The Mentor and Peer (MAP) project, run by a community service volunteer charity, is interesting because it aims to avoid the mistake of similar schemes: waiting for young people to break the law before offering them mentorship,” its editorial said.

CSV Cambridgeshire Mentors and Peers was established in 2002. It has continued to expand and grow, recruiting and training 18 dedicated and passionate volunteers who are making a huge difference to the lives of young people in Cambridge and the surrounding area. “Research showing how volunteers can help fight crime in the UK, showing that volunteering has an impact on reducing – or even preventing – crime. Unfortunately, despite its success and support from local youth crime services, CSV Cambridgeshire Mentors Due to lack of funding, Peers will no longer be able to mentor local young people.”

Government programs have not all been very successful. The Sure Start program is expected to be very successful, but the interim results of the evaluation are not very encouraging. On Track programs have been successful in reaching high-risk households in deprived areas, but uptake of these services has been lower than expected. However, the program has good reviews among parents and children who use it. The program runs the risk of stigmatizing the children and families it intends to help because it is an individual rather than an area-based study. Another model borrowed from the US, caring communities, is currently being rolled out in the UK. Other government initiatives have also shown mixed results at best. The Youth Inclusion Program targets 10 hours of intervention per person per week, but in reality very few young people (less than 10%) achieve this attendance. The SSP program has had great success in reducing truancy and increasing test pass rates. Based on an evaluation of violation data from three schools using the SSP model of full-time police officers plus support teams, a before-and-after study found 139 violations could be prevented each year.

Another important initiative, Every Child Matters, was in response to the tragic death of Victoria Climbie in 2002, who had been abused, tortured and murdered by her own relatives. In response, the government launched a public inquiry, followed by a consultation paper Every Child Matters (DfES 2003). It provides a new initiative to ensure the well-being of children and young people under the age of 19. It ensures that children are intervened before the point of crisis.

Until recently, evaluations of juvenile delinquency programs were limited to two main programs – the Dalston Youth Program (DYP) and CHANCE – due to limited empirical evidence. Another project, Youth At Risk (YAR), has gained publicity but has not yet undergone independent published research. DYP runs programs for young people aged 11-14 and 15-18 from one of the most deprived boroughs in England and Wales. Studies of older populations suggest that there may be some effect on self-reported crime and truancy (though not drug use). DYP worked successfully with about half of the participants. However, about half were not involved in the program in any meaningful way. The overall impact on non-compliance was disappointing, while gains in other areas such as behavior, attitudes and learning were modest.

CHANCE is another important UK tutoring scheme, established in 1996 to help primary school pupils with behavioral problems. Due to the extremely small size of the assessment, the number of children was very limited. Another major UK study evaluated 10 mentoring programs for highly disadvantaged young people. The study found that mentoring had a critical and significant impact on the lives of disaffected young people in the context of participation in education, training and employment.

Juvenile delinquency is a sensitive topic in the Western world. While available data on juvenile crime suggests that crime rates among young people aged 12 to 30 have declined over the past fifteen years, some experts say the data need to be scrutinized. There has also been a lively debate in the media and in politics over the out-of-focus juvenile delinquency. While politicians and the public generally exhibit a knee-jerk reaction to juvenile delinquency in favor of harsher punishments, multiple studies continue to point to a lack of understanding and appreciation for juvenile delinquency. Studies have shown that the majority of youth crimes are petty crimes, even child mischief.

However, research on the topic has identified some risk factors associated with juvenile delinquency that are nearly predictable. As a result, there is now almost unanimous agreement that early intervention approaches to crime prevention are highly successful, whereas traditional punitive, criminal, and retaliatory justice approaches not only entail enormous financial costs, but also struggle to reduce crime. . Government and voluntary agencies have a number of programs aimed at identifying at-risk groups in the population and intervening in a timely manner. Earlier, many case studies came to light, further boosting confidence in early intervention methods. These programs have had mixed results due to target group apathy. Some projects based on community and neighborhood approaches have shown better results.

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