A 20-Year-Old Man Comes To The Emergency Department 8 Hours Drug Abuse and the Gender Gap

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Drug Abuse and the Gender Gap

Prescription drug use continues to rise, with nearly three in five Americans taking prescription drugs, including antidepressants and opioids.

In a study published in JAMA, researchers found that prescription drug use among people 20 and older has risen to 59 percent from 51 percent a decade ago, and is rising faster than ever quick. During the same period, the number of people taking five or more prescription drugs nearly doubled, from 8 percent to 15 percent.

The Impact of Gender on Addiction

It’s no surprise, then, that the non-medical use of prescription drugs, including pain relievers, sedatives, and sedatives, continues to be a growing problem in the United States. Statistics show men misuse prescription drugs more than women, but the gap between the sexes is narrowing. According to a recent government study on gendered medicine, women aged 12 to 17 are less likely to take abusive prescription drugs, while men of the same age group abuse and distribution is much higher. The same report showed that young adult women had higher rates of addiction to cocaine and prescription drugs, even though men in that age group abused these drugs more frequently and in high doses.

Disturbingly, recent statistics show that overdose deaths are increasing among young women, especially those addicted to opioids. CDC Vital Signs reports that since 1999, deaths from opioid overdoses among women have increased by 400%. By comparison, there was about a 265 percent increase in opioid overdose deaths among young men in the same age group. The CDC estimates that as many as 18 women in the U.S. die each day from an opioid overdose, most of which are obtained by prescription.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, women are less likely than men to receive adequate treatment for substance abuse in order to continue the troubling downward trend in substance use abuse. Research shows that women are less likely than men to be placed in a specialist hospital but tend to be treated by a primary care provider or through a mental health program. Women also face additional barriers preventing them from receiving treatment, such as lower income, the possibility of pregnancy and the need to care for children. In addition, women are more likely to hide their substance abuse for a variety of reasons, including fear of social stigma, loss of child custody, or repercussions from a partner or spouse.

In the past, research on drug addiction was conducted from the male perspective of both men and women, and substance abuse prevention programs and rehabilitation facilities were designed with a focus on the needs of men. In contrast, today’s outreach, preventative education, and detoxification are geared toward meeting the needs of both men and women, as the scientific and medical communities become more aware of how and why these patterns of addiction occur in both men and women And tailor-made.

Because gender roles play a role in addiction, gender-specific treatment programs can relieve social stressors in everyday life. Patients can focus on their own recovery without interference from the opposite sex. Research shows that both men and women are more willing to communicate with members of their own gender about issues such as sexuality, social prejudice and domestic abuse.

Both men and women with opioid addiction can benefit from comprehensive recovery programs that focus on the full range of care needed to break free from addiction. These programs take patients from detoxification to inpatient treatment, partial hospitalization, outpatient services, and transitional living. Effective treatment therapies include:

  • fitness training

  • Experimental and Overall Mode

  • follow up program

  • family or marriage counseling

  • nutrition counseling

With the support of trained multidisciplinary staff, individuals of both sexes can be helped to recover from addiction and regain hope for the future.

According to a 2014 SAMHSA report, men are more likely than women to use illicit drugs of all types that lead to emergency room visits or overdose deaths. These drugs include marijuana (under federal law) and misused prescription drugs. Men in most age groups have higher rates of use and dependence on illicit drugs and alcohol than women. However, women are just as likely to become addicted as men, but more likely to become addicted to prescription and illicit drugs. Women are also more prone to cravings and relapses, which are key stages in the addiction cycle.

SAMHSA went a step further in their research and found that women of color may face other unique issues with drug use and treatment needs. For example, African-American and American Indian/Alaska Native women are more likely than women from other racial and ethnic groups to be victims of rape, physical violence, and lifetime intimate partner stalking—issues that are risk factors for substances used and should be addressed during treatment.

In addition to substance abuse being influenced by personality traits, research shows that, for the most part, women use substances differently, respond differently to them, and often have unique barriers that prevent them from receiving effective treatment. Some of these barriers are as simple as not being able to find childcare or receiving undertested prescription treatments for women.

Researchers continue to study to learn more about the different factors that lead to drug addiction in men and women. Because of their ability to effectively identify these factors, the medical community is better equipped to develop programs to increase an individual’s chances of breaking free from an addictive lifestyle.

They learn that the physical and psychological differences between men and women can affect how they are introduced to the abusive individual’s ability to succeed in a treatment program

In a July 2016 article, CNN reported:

“Globally, drug use has remained stable over the past four years, but researchers have found that heroin use in the United States has grown by 145 percent since 2007, according to a report by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.”

According to the 2016 World Drug Report, one in 20 adults (about a quarter of one billion people aged 15 to 64) used at least one illicit or inappropriate drug in 2014. global population, new trends have emerged, including increased sales in anonymous online marketplaces.

UN researchers also reported gender differences in drug use. Men were three times more likely than women to use marijuana, cocaine or amphetamines, and women were more likely to use opioids and sedatives for non-medical purposes.

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