A Four-Month-Old Child That Does Follow Movement With His Eyes Right Brain Learning

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Right Brain Learning

Many people learn very well by sight. They can watch someone do something, and then they can replicate the task with practice. Others learn very well through their sense of hearing, by listening to instructions. Most people tend to learn best by combining their senses including seeing, hearing and doing. Doing is kin aesthetic or our feeling. Other learning moments rely heavily on taste and smell, such as when someone is trying to become a chef. For most of us, it is the experience of feeling/doing that helps us actually integrate new information and skills. Once we are actively involved in whatever we are learning, it is easier for us to progress.

Many years ago, I worked as an adapted physical education teacher in San Diego, CA. Some of my students are “severely disturbed”. I remember an eight-year-old boy who couldn’t write his own name. His teachers didn’t know how to help him succeed because all his previous efforts had failed. One day, I wrote the boy’s name on the ground in big letters with chalk. I had him walk on each letter, tracing them with his body movements. Every time he does this, I make him speak the letter. After this experience, he knows how to spell his name. He just needs to integrate this information kin aesthetically. He was relaxed and had a great time. This is right-brain learning.

It is natural to learn through our senses. We see, hear, smell, taste and feel. These signals are received by the body before reaching the brain with conscious awareness. Children will study an object visually with great intensity. They touch their cheek or lips with something. They often smell or taste things. Why do babies put everything in their mouths? This is because they learn about the world around them through their tongues. They touch and feel in a wider way because it is natural. They learn first through their senses and then how to think. We are all like that. Sensory learning is primary and logical learning is secondary. When we use more or our mind’s natural ability to learn, we have more resources to create successful outcomes.

The learning process is divided into four parts:

1. The role of the teacher is to share information.

2. It is the student’s job to pay attention to what is happening.

3. The student’s role is to receive and hopefully integrate new information.

4. It is the student’s job to recall information when needed, such as when taking an exam or when it is useful in real life.

Regarding #1, the part where the teacher shares information, the funny thing is that when we were kindergarteners, we would happily learn new things by engaging our senses. We learn the ABCs by song, by the rhyme “September, April, June and November…30 days…” We learn simple addition and subtraction by counting items such as blocks or sticks to move them from one place to another another place. We are actively engaged through sensory awareness.

Some of these tactile learning skills continue into first and second grade, but usually by third grade, most instruction shifts from right-brain to left-brain instruction. This means it shifts from primary sensory learning to secondary logical learning. Now we are taught to memorize multiplication tables, names or dates when math is nothing more than numbers on paper. There is a better way.

Learning through right-brain sensory awareness is primary.

Learning through left-brain intellectual concepts is secondary.

Studies have shown that when children engage in right-brain activities such as music or dancing, they perform better in left-brain activities such as math and English. When we teach children through a right-brain approach, they are more excited and excited. They won’t get bored and can learn in an engaging and enjoyable way.

Let’s look at #2, the student’s ability to focus. A lack of this ability is often labeled ADD or ADHD. I strongly believe that it is unrealistic to expect a young child to sit in a chair for hours each day as his or her brain is receiving information. Many children were given medication so that they could adjust to this very unnatural pattern. Young animals are naturally active and energetic. Another common effect behind this problem is lack of sleep. When kids are tired, they have to overstimulate themselves to stay awake.

Consider a small child who spends most of his or her time at home, where the environment is often peaceful. Even with siblings, the amount of external stimulation is limited. Now that same kid is three, four, or five, and they’re put in a room with twenty or twenty-five other kids. The child has no experience of learning how to block out so many external stimuli. Even though the classroom is quiet, many children are very sensitive, and they can feel that there is energy in the classroom.

Why do we expect all children to automatically pay attention in class, when most never have the opportunity to learn how to pay attention?

right brain and memory

Using the following stories, I want to build on the idea of ​​using sensory learning to better integrate information and facilitate later recall of it. When we use our senses, it is easier to recall information when needed.

“You’re riding your bike and you see a shiny quartz crystal on the ground. You stop and pick it up. You hold it up to the sun and you can see a little rainbow deep inside. Now you’ve come to a The big “fountain has something unusual on it. The water flows into 3 pools. There are pennies and coins in each pool. You make a wish and throw your quartz crystal into the water. It shimmers in the water. “

sensory integration

* You are riding a bicycle – visualize it all in your head. Feel it. What kind of bike is this? What color is your bike?

* You see shiny quartz crystals – what shape, size etc.

* You hold it up to the sun – feel the sun on your face.

*You see a little rainbow in there – describe it to me. (see.)

* You come to the fountain and there is something unusual on it. What’s on it? Describe it to me. (see)

*Water flows down into 3 pools filled with coins and coins (Look. See the coins glistening underwater. Feel the water splashing in your face.)

* Imagine making a wish and throwing the crystal into the water glistening in the sun.

I tell the story two or three times while engaging the child through his or her imagination. Then, I ask the children to tell me stories. Most children find this easy for them to do, and they tend to be fairly accurate in recalling key elements. It’s not about how much time has passed. Even weeks later, they were still able to retell the story with relative ease.

I use the following methods to help children focus more effectively:

Laser beam

First, let’s talk about the laser beam. The laser beam picks up the random flow of scattered electrons and moves them all in one direction. Instead of being scattered, the electrons form a line of energy, a laser powerful enough to be stealthy or gentle enough to perform delicate eye surgery. What started out as scattered chaos becomes focused and useful.

Then we talk about how the mind is. It can be diffuse or like a laser beam. When it’s like a laser beam, it has a lot of energy. I further mentioned that when they are listening to a teacher or concentrating on their studies, that is the best time for their mind to be like a laser beam. Then we can do the following activities:

laser beam activity

Whenever possible, sit across from the child you are helping, eye to eye. Tell him or her to be like a laser beam. All they can do is focus on you and your voice. No matter what is going on around them, they will pay more attention to you and what they are learning. Now retell the short story.

Next we add some external stimuli. I have another person stand behind the sitting child. This person’s job is to distract. They can talk, jump or clap their hands etc. When you retell the story, they continue to do so. You can make a suggestion like this: “No matter how many things are going on around you, you are more focused like a laser beam. You are focused like a laser beam, and nothing interrupts or disturbs you.” This will continue several times, each time The level of distraction will increase. Finally, let your child tell you the story and see how they can focus on you without distractions. This process can be repeated with other stories, and great results can be found when we use information that children need to learn in school. We can turn their most challenging subject areas into successful and enjoyable experiences.

Below is a real-life example of how the same sensory learning works in more advanced adult learning situations.

I once worked with a client in her 50s who decided to start a new career. She wants to be an accountant. She felt overwhelmed by the amount of information she needed to study and was very worried about passing the exam. Now, nothing could be further from the creative influence than accounting and numbers, but we were able to use the right brain to our advantage in her learning process.

In her imagination, we create a community. In the first house lived a single mother with two children. We put the necessary tax information on the door and around the house. We built it into this single mom’s life. The next shop is a man who works from home. Again, we imagine the man, what he does, and the tax benefits he gets working from home. For example, “He is allowed to write off ‘x’ percent of his utility bills” becomes an image of his lights throughout the house, each displaying a number representing the percentage allowed for the tax benefit. Soon we had a full community thread with most of the information needed.

I’m happy to say this client passed her test the first time! She felt calm and competent throughout. The information she needed was easy to recall and she didn’t feel stressed but had a great time.

These few examples demonstrate ways to bring right-brain, sensory processing into learning. As you progress, keep these basic ideas in mind:

* Make the image as real as possible – feel like it really happened.

* The sillier the image, the easier it is to remember the information. (Think Geico gecko.)

* Connect one idea to another so that they form a storyline.

* Make up a song or a nursery rhyme to remember the information.

* Relax and enjoy the process!

Learning becomes fun and easy when we use more of our minds to learn. Relaxing and enjoying allows for easier integration and access to new information. Imagine how different our education system would be if we decided to embrace this natural way of learning! Are you ready to experience what your brain can do for you?

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