A Newborn Infant Who Is 24-Hours-Old Is On A 4-Hour A Philadelphia Eye Injury Attorney Talks About Eye Injury Claims

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A Philadelphia Eye Injury Attorney Talks About Eye Injury Claims

Eye injury claims usually require expert testimony from a vision specialist. A vision specialist will meet with the injured person, review medical reports and prepare a specialist report discussing the psychosocial aspects of visual impairment, the impact of visual impairment on daily life, and treatment and support for those with visual impairment. The following are examples of such reports:

medical history

Mrs. M.’s most recent ophthalmologist visit documented a change in vision in her right eye from 20/200 to “light perception”. As Dr. Elliot points out, this is a significant reduction in usable vision.

In the office, Mrs. M appears tense. Her right eye was disfigured around the eye, with a red sclera. Mrs. M often squints under the fluorescent lights in her office.

Since the incident, Mrs. M has developed a marked degree of blepharospasm in both eyes. Blepharospasm is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause “uncontrollable blinking and squeezing of the eyelids.” It “involves both eyes and may cause a temporary inability to see during the spasm”. Dictionary of Ophthalmic Terms, 3rd Edition, Barbara Cassin, Sheila AB Solomon, Triad Publishing Co. Gainesville, FL, 1997. In addition to the resulting loss of functional vision, it is also very unpleasant in appearance, causing the eyes to squint and blink. During spasms, the eyelids close almost completely, resulting in loss of visual function.

Mrs. M. described a progressive decline in vision in her right eye and stated that she could only see with her left eye. She complained of pain in the orbital area and the tissues around the eyes, all the way up to her ears. Ms. M described a situation in which hearing loss co-occurred with vision loss. This is not documented in other medical findings. This discomfort is worse in cold weather.

Mrs. M’s right eye has only light perception and her function is monocular vision. Monocular vision leaves her with no depth perception. Lack of depth perception affects all activities that require binocular vision. These extend to everyday life, mobile, work and recreational activities.

Some of the activities that Mrs. M. found difficult included: reaching for items on grocery store shelves, measuring ingredients, pouring liquids, doing laundry, going up and down stairs, using public transportation, daycare, and playing recreational mahjong, and cards.

Mrs M said she used to read for pleasure. She did not read a book after the incident due to discomfort with combined vision problems. She also reduced the frequency of her letters to her family. She used the phone instead of the letters she used to write to her children and families in the Philippines and Italy.

Mrs. M.’s pattern of movement is typical for a vision-impaired person who has not received vision rehabilitation or orientation and mobility training.

She had to carefully protect her left eye during the event and wear goggles to preserve her remaining vision. Monocular vision, and the depth perception problems it creates, make it more difficult for individuals to judge distance and increase the incidence of both minor and more serious accidents.

I made two sets of goggles to simulate Mrs. M’s vision deficiency. The first set simulated 20/200 vision, which was Ms. M’s vision when she visited the doctor on March 16, 2004. The second pair of goggles simulates Mrs. M’s vision when she visited Dr. Werner on April 21, 2005, which is light perception without projection. These devices do not simulate blepharospasm.

Can not move

In terms of actions, Mrs. M was observed walking in the unfamiliar office environment, on the steps and in the open car park. Mrs. M uses a tweaked trailing technique. She drags/feels along the wall with her left hand until she reaches a clearing. Mrs. M enters the clearing through a tentative half-shuffled door. When going through the doorway, she grasped it with her left hand and guided herself through it.

Negotiate the steps in a non-alternating descent pattern, joining the same step with the left foot first and then the right foot. (Typical adult pattern is alternating feet.) Ms. M stands on the left side first, then holds on to the handrail with her right hand, as if she would prefer to use her left hand to descend from the left side. Ascent is similar.

In the sunny parking lot, Mrs. M expresses discomfort with the bright light. She crossed the clearing again with a tentative gait. There is no evidence of a protective posture at this time. She walks more comfortably when she is able to drag a car, wall, or other object with her hands.

Vision loss is one cause of mobility impairment. Before the incident, Mrs M was taking public transport to work, which she was doing at the time of the incident. She cannot travel alone now.

She uses her left eye but does not scan. She needs training to get into the habit of scanning while walking. She will benefit from a long cane.

Mrs. M’s son reported that she had fallen several times since the incident. Outside, she encountered undetected curbs and bumps. Inside, she bumped into tables and chairs. Her family is concerned for her safety while traveling and at home. When she travels by bus, she is accompanied by a sister or friend. As a result, she has significantly reduced the amount of travel she takes for recreation and activities of daily living.

Other functional limitations

Before the incident, Ms. M claimed to have participated in a wide range of activities independently. In her community life, she takes day trips, goes to church and social gatherings, babysitting the grandchildren, and plays mahjong and cards with friends. She took public transportation to the grocery store, went shopping, and worked as a babysitter. At home, she cleans, cooks, and does laundry. She likes to read, and she likes to dress up for social events. She leads a very active, independent life and is active in the Filipino community.

Because of her vision loss, and the resulting mobility and perception problems, among other injuries, she needs assistance with shopping. She has trouble picking items off shelves because she “misses” things she reaches for at the grocery store. Due to her lack of depth perception, she sometimes misses the glass when pouring liquids from the pitcher. She is afraid of cutting food, afraid of hurting herself. After a few accidents and “making a mess,” she no longer uses the stove or microwave to cook. Overall, she and her family feel that cooking is too dangerous.

She does not read due to visual discomfort. She doesn’t play mahjong anymore. She cut back a lot of social activities and no longer wears makeup. Whether this was due to physical discomfort, social discomfort, or depression, I could not determine in the 45 minute interview.

Mrs. M seemed distraught by her situation and it was difficult for her to talk about how her life had changed. She seems passionate about what she used to do. When asked how she currently spends her time, she said she sits in her bedroom all day playing solitaire. (She says she has to hold the card close to her face to read it.) Her husband now cleans the house, cooks and does the laundry. He also works 4-6 hours a day. Her son said the husband was not used to doing these chores and there was friction in the family due to the role reversal. Because of this conflict, the couple fights and argues more frequently.

Mrs. M maintains personal hygiene such as showering, brushing teeth, combing hair and dressing.

She has fewer activities with her grandchildren and is no longer babysitting. Her five-year-old grandson asked her what happened to her face.

suggestion

Mrs. M will benefit from a full evaluation by a Vision Rehabilitation Therapist or Low Vision Therapist. I highly recommend intensive rehabilitation so she can learn the skills to take care of herself and participate in activities of her choice. She will benefit from a mobility assessment with an orientation and mobility instructor, as well as orientation and mobility training for safe, independent indoor and outdoor travel.

An evaluation professional will determine the course of treatment. My conservative estimate for initial rehab and follow-up is 2 hours of private rehab per week for at least 4 months. This will cost approximately $90.00 per hour. Also in direction and movement, 2 hours of directional movement training per week for at least 4 months. This will also cost approximately $90.00 per hour. Once complete, the professionals working with her will develop a follow-up and skills maintenance schedule. Again, my estimate is $90.00 per hour for 6 to 12 months of monthly follow-up for 2 hour sessions.

Mrs. M needs audiology tests for her hearing loss. Her hearing loss exacerbated the functional and safety issues that came with her vision loss and added communication problems.

People with monovision have a much greater risk of visual impairment in their good eye than people with normal vision. I advise Mrs. M to wear protective glasses and move carefully.

I’m sending her catalogs with all kinds of chore-friendly items like large-size phones, playing cards with large markers, stove and microwave controls for the visually impaired, and more. It will cost approximately $500.00 to furnish her home with some of the items she needs. There may be additional costs for materials related to her recovery. These materials will help her become more independent and active in her family and community.

Mrs. M. is going through a period of grief and loss associated with vision loss. I would advise the doctor and family to be aware of this and monitor her for signs of depression. I suggested she join a support group for people with vision loss.

in conclusion

People in their 60s can work, play an active role in the lives of their grandkids, run errands, do chores, and live lives to the full. Since the incident, Ms. M is no longer a caregiver, but a care consumer. Mrs. M experienced a life-changing event. She has lost a great deal of confidence in her abilities in everyday life. Although she may never regain pre-incident function, rehabilitation and orientation and mobility training will help her become more independent with residual vision.

All of the conditions and functional consequences mentioned here are the direct result of Mrs. M’s visual impairment as a result of her injuries. All my opinions are stated with reasonable professional and scientific certainty.

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