Advice To.Give A 15 Year.Old.On Their First Job Interview Top 10 Mistakes on CVs and Resumes

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Top 10 Mistakes on CVs and Resumes

At my job, I read 50 to 100 resumes a day, so I thought I could offer some advice to job seekers who are having trouble interviewing for a position they think is a good fit. I am no longer surprised as I see the same mistakes being repeated every day, but when I first started in the recruiting business I was amazed that one of the most important documents in one’s life received so little attention and attention. The resumes I receive every day are filled with misspellings, grammatical errors or hard to understand.

Here are some of my favorite misspellings.

  • “SWAT Analysis” – What does the A stand for?
  • “Network Sight” – looks good!
  • “Professional” – very

Here are my top 10 mistakes or places where people let themselves down in the job market.

1. Spelling, grammar and spelling errors.

There are no excuses, you can use a spell checker, a grammar checker, and ask friends, family, and colleagues to read your resume. I’m sure I’ll make mistakes in this blog, but it’s not nearly as important as the first impression a mistake makes on a gatekeeper or potential employer like myself. If you can spot the mistake I’m making here – you can proofread your own resume!

A recent survey of employers found that 38% of employers would reject a resume on the first typo they spot, and that number rises to 64% if there are two mistakes. But you don’t need statistics to tell you that if you make a typo or misspelling and send it off to your employer without noticing and correcting it, you’re in trouble. I think you’re either not smart enough to get help, or too lazy to be bothered and refuse to press.

2. Cover letter

Don’t pay too much attention to the cover letter. I know recruiters who don’t even read them. I do, for three reasons.

a) See if you have the ability to put together a formal business letter. It might sound silly in this day and age, but you need a foundation to build on, and this at least proves some cornerstone.

b) See if you have analyzed the job ad and considered the position and company, and spend some time customizing a letter to cover your resume. Many times I have received cover letters that mention other roles and have been sent to different companies. That’s the sign of a desperate candidate who’s shooting applications for every role under the sun.

c) See if I can understand why you are looking for a new role. It’s this motivation that can give you insight into a candidate’s ability to perform in the next role. The important points of a cover letter are:

  • No typos!
  • 1 page only
  • Customized for each application
  • If it’s not all what you want to do, how can the company benefit?

3. Career goals

I don’t know when this idea of ​​putting career goals first on a resume became popular, but it seems to me pointless and probably inaccurate. If you have a head, you try to absorb and make the target work, if you don’t, it reads stuff like this.

“With 10 years of extensive management experience in the oil industry, I seek a senior management position that will allow me to use my experience to guide and train my team.”

I don’t see any positives in attaching career goals to a resume, I can only see the negatives:

  • It puts you in a bind – maybe I don’t want someone coaching and training a team or someone from the oil industry
  • You may seem overly ambitious or not ambitious enough
  • they are too general and selfish

If you really think you need to convey this information, put it in your cover letter and tailor it to each role you’re applying for.

4. Your resume looks like the job description

Don’t use statements like “responsible for” or “responsibility included,” these phrases belong in the job description and not the resume. You’ll need to focus on achievements and accomplishments for your current and previous roles, and determine how you’ve earned extra achievements. How Your Current or Previous Employer Benefited From Hiring You:

  • Have you attracted new clients? How many?
  • Have you saved your business money? How many?
  • Have you implemented specific procedures. How long did it take?
  • Have you made your business more efficient? How and how much?

Employers will expect you to be able to carry out the assigned responsibilities of the position, so there is no need to reflect on these. You need to show why you will add more value than any other candidate. This is your perfect opportunity to spark interest and differentiate yourself by showcasing your accomplishments.

5. What did you do again?

Ever been asked what your occupation is at a party, and within about 0.1 second of you starting to answer you see the other person’s eyes glaze over? When I read about 50% of resumes, that’s me and I know what I’m looking for! I know the lingo, I know the company, I know the job title.

“Explain it to me like my 4 year old”

Don’t think this contradicts the above, but we need some details about the company, your internal and external customers, and your products or services.

The company you work for – tell me:

  • Briefly introduce the business.
  • How big is it, approximate revenue, no employees, etc.?
  • how old is it
  • main competitor

If you don’t, and I don’t know the company, I’ll have to go online and spend time looking it up. Why waste my time when you already know all the answers.

What did you do, tell me:

  • Which accounts have you managed, Coles, IBM, FOX?
  • Which products/brands have you managed, Duracell, Libra, VB?
  • What brand of machine do you use, Schindler, CASE, Canon?
  • Which vendors did you use, AC Nielsen, Saatchi & Saatchi, SAP?

Please provide details so I can understand the intricacies of your previous positions and your suitability for the job you are applying for. The details also allow me to track your career development and review past job-changing decisions you’ve made.

Tell me who you report to and who you report to:

Every organization uses different job titles. Not only will this confuse potential employers (often on purpose), but it also means you need to provide context for your role in the organization. Is your title a “Brand Manager” and report to the Marketing Manager, or are you a “Marketing Manager” and report directly to the CEO? How many direct reports do you manage, and if relevant, do you have dotted line accountability to anyone? If you can explain the background of your previous positions in just a few clear sentences, you’ll get a head start and not be one of those discarded resumes that employers don’t understand.

6. How long is too long?

I’m sure we’ve all been told at one point or another that we should keep our resumes to one page. Well, if you follow my advice from point 5, unless you just graduated or only have one job, you’re going to struggle with this. There’s no right or wrong answer here, but my recommendation is to keep it to 3 pages or less — preferably 2. You need to craft your resume, so remove all extraneous information and make all your points clear and concise. If you need a hint, remove the following:

  • career goal
  • Any “job description” phrase
  • Paragraphs or bullet points summarizing your skills; make sure you emphasize these based on the role you play
  • Include hobbies and memberships; I either don’t care, or worse, I might hold a grudge against a group you belong to!don’t give me a chance
  • References: Don’t put them on your resume, and you don’t need to tell me they’re on request, of course! When I need them, I ask for them.
  • Any other irrelevant information that has no impact on the interview, or worse, might give me a reason to dislike you.

Try to keep it to 2 pages if you can. That’s enough space to give anyone an insight into what you’ve accomplished, your skills and experience.

7. Your resume is missing keywords.

We should all know the power of Google by now. This is primarily based on web crawling of keywords, which are then searched by users who are directed to the most relevant pages.

guess what? That’s what I do most of the day. I use “keyword search” to search our database. I insert the relevant phrase or word into the character I’m trying to fill into our database search engine and see what pops up. I might want a brand manager who focuses on new product development for the organic food industry. So if your resume contains words like “brand,” “new product development,” or “new product development” and “organic,” you stand a chance of appearing in my search results.

You need to make sure:

  • use the correct jargon
  • Reference customers and suppliers
  • Use brand and category names
  • If you use a phrase like “enterprise resource planning,” add the acronym “ERP” elsewhere on your resume

If appropriate, mirror the job ad you are interested in. If they use a phrase like “engineering solution” and you can attest to this from your experience, reflect that phrase on your resume.

Print your resume and highlight key words with a pen. Count it up, and if it’s below 20, revise it and look for opportunities to add more. The more likely to hit, the better. Include keywords in your cover letter as well, many companies also scan for these keywords and include them in their database, we do.

8. Too much detail on old characters.

I don’t need to know the intricacies of 20 years ago when you worked at your local supermarket through high school. You need to weigh the details for your most relevant and recent roles.

This will also help you keep the length of your resume under 3 pages. Remember, if it’s not relevant to the position you’re applying for, I wouldn’t spend too much time on it. Focus on your most recent 2-3 roles and briefly describe any older roles unless they are clearly related to the role you are applying for.

Age discrimination can also be a problem if you detail every role in your long and illustrious career. If the employer has a personal bias, they may think you are too old for the position, or maybe even pay too much to hire you because of your experience. It’s a personal choice when putting your resume together, but try a few different formats to see if you’re more successful at landing one style of interview than another.

9. Fancy and distorted formatting.

Formatting is fundamental to making your resume accessible and comprehensible.

Avoid any fancy formatting or added design templates that you think will help you stand out. What matters is the content, not any fluff surrounding it. I’ve seen fancy borders, gradient shadows, emoji and smiley faces, pictures and other graphics. (I’m not kidding!)

My suggestion is to use standard fonts throughout the document and keep bold and italics to a minimum. The more complex the documents, the more likely electronic scanning systems will have difficulty handling them.

Also, pay attention to tabs, margins, and page size. By complicating your document, you could end up sending a resume with missing bullet points, page breaks leaving blank pages, fonts not showing and a lot of ugly and hard to read results.

Practice sending your formatted document to a few friends and have them print it out and return it to you. Make the necessary changes to ensure the end result is what you expected.

10. Contact information

Make sure your contact information is current and correct. There have been many times I have tried to contact candidates and they have only provided a home phone number or a disconnected cell phone number. Of course, I’d go the extra mile to find a strong candidate, but if I’m hesitant, this could be the turning point.

It’s so easy, you forgot to check it. You need to ensure the following:

  • The mobile number is correct and you have answering service, so you can leave a message
  • Home/work phone just in case
  • A valid email address, preferably not something like [email protected]
  • Residential address in case location may be an issue

I hope the above information is helpful to your job hunting. Welcome to leave a message below and look forward to your feedback.

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