Compared To 20-Year-Olds 35-Year-Olds Are Less Likely To: Economic Impact Of Sportfishing

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Economic Impact Of Sportfishing

As anglers, I suspect we don’t even realize the impact we have on our country’s economy. Hopefully this gives you some insight into the positive cash flow we’re generating by doing something we’re so passionate about.

In the past, I have designed several websites for tournament anglers and in the process I wanted to gather data to present to potential supporters and sponsors to understand impact and engagement. I recently “rediscovered” this data and thought you might find it interesting. So below are some numbers I’ve gathered from various sources that paint a good picture of how fishing has evolved into a money-making state in the past.

Now, the only ripples your fishing friend is interested in are the ripples the fish makes when they come to the surface at the end of the line. But overall, the money spent on fishing gear, fuel for boats and filming films of those who didn’t escape is having a hugely positive impact on the economy. The average angler spends over $1,200 a year on the sport. Hidden but still real is a multiplier factor that can effectively triple your spending as the initial payout ripples through the economy. As an example, an angler spends $10 on a new bait. Spread out like the ripples created when a bait touches water. This income helps shop owners pay rent, bills and staff. Those people then spend some of the money on other goods and services, and the chain reaction spreads and repeats further. Of course, $10 by itself isn’t a big deal, but when 44 million anglers spend $41.5 billion a year, the resulting effect on jobs, wages and other economic effects is a remarkable pillar of the health of the US economy. The typical angler is more focused on catching the end of his line and gives little thought to how his hobby can help his fellow Americans reap the great benefits. The 1.1 million jobs, $7.3 billion in taxes and $30 billion in wages generated by recreational fishing are many times that of corporate giants such as Ford, Microsoft or Nike. With a total output of more than $116 billion, the very simple act of dipping a line into the water provides nine times the economic benefits of commercial fishing. ‘

“I love fishing because it’s totally relaxing. I love the water. I can concentrate and forget about all my worries. I count my blessings while I fish.” President George W. Bush. “

44.4 million Americans age 7 and older fish2 (estimated 50 million fish, including all age groups). One in six U.S. residents is 16 and older. 1 25 percent of U.S. men fish and 8 percent of U.S. women fish. 1 Excluding Great Lakes anglers, freshwater anglers accounted for 82 percent of all anglers. Anglers spend an average of 16 days fishing and take an average of 13 fishing trips per year. Anglers aged 16 and over took 365 million freshwater fishing trips in 2001, totaling 467 million days. Including saltwater anglers, a total of 437 million fishing attempts were made for a total of 557 million days. From 1991 to 1996, the number of freshwater fishing days increased by 13%. The average number of freshwater fishing days per angler increased from 14.3 days in 1991 to 16.7 days in 1996. Between 1980 and 1995, the number of Americans fishing increased by 16 percent. Southern dwellers had the largest increase in catches (21 percent) between 1980 and 1995. From 1980 to 1995, the number of men fishing increased by 14%.

Popularity:

Fishing is the fourth most popular sport in the United States. It ranks ahead of cycling, bowling, basketball, golf, jogging, baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, tennis, soccer, and skiing. Only walking, swimming and camping are more popular. More Americans fish than golf and tennis combined. More Americans are fishing than playing football and basketball. Since 1991, the number of youth aged 12 to 17 involved in freshwater fishing has increased by 10.9 percent to 4.5 million. During the same period, the number of 12- to 17-year-olds playing baseball fell 15.4 percent to 4 million. Participation in basketball, softball, tennis and volleyball fell 2 percent to 46 percent. Fishing is the second most popular water-based outdoor sport in the United States. Swimming is number one. Freshwater fishing ranked in the top five in seven states. General fishing (freshwater and saltwater) was ranked among the top five most-participated sports in 18 states. Fishing is the most played sport in Minnesota, Florida, New Jersey and North Carolina.

Women and Minorities:

11.9 million females 7 years and older fish. That’s more people than jogging, basketball, volleyball, softball, golf or tennis. Freshwater fishing was the 10th most popular sport among women. 2 26.8% of anglers are women2 (8% of the US female population). 5% of all anglers are black (7% of the black population). 5% of all anglers are Hispanic (7% of the Hispanic population). From 1980 to 1995, the number of women fishing increased by 19 percent, while the number of men fished increased by 14 percent. The region with the largest increase in female fishing was in the Northeast. Women spend an average of $246 per year on travel-related fishing expenses and $70 per year on fishing equipment, for a total of $3 billion. Hispanics fish less than African Americans and women, but they spend more on average — $434 per angler for travel and $154 for gear. Hispanics spend a combined $696 million annually on fishing trips and equipment. Between 1991 and 1996, African American anglers spent 43 percent more on fishing equipment. African American anglers spend an average of $324 per year on travel-related fishing expenses and $128 per year on fishing equipment, for a total of $814 million. African-American anglers spent, on average, more days fishing (22 days vs. 18 days) and more days traveling (18 days vs. 14 days) than all anglers. 64 percent of African American anglers live in the South, compared to 39 percent of all anglers. 43% of female anglers live in the South. 16 percent of African American anglers live in the Midwest. 26 percent of female anglers live in the Midwest. 43 percent of Hispanic anglers live in the South. Thirty-eight percent of Hispanic anglers live in the West, compared to 20 percent of all anglers. Between 1991 and 1996, the number of days fishing by African-American anglers increased by 72 percent, while the number of days for all anglers increased by 22 percent. The number of fishing days for female anglers increased by 15 percent between 1991 and 1996. The number of fishing days among Hispanic anglers remained constant between 1991 and 1996, but spending on fishing trips increased by 50 percent over the same period. The 1.9 million persons with disabilities aged 16 and over took 33 million fishing trips and 41 million fishing days in 2001.

Why people fish:

33% of anglers fish to relax. 25% of anglers use fishing as a way to spend time with family and friends. 65% of non-anglers and 88% of anglers said being asked by their kids made them want to go fishing, or made them want to fish more often.

What people fish for and where:

Bass fishing is the most popular form of fishing in the United States. 38% of freshwater anglers in the United States fish for bass. 28 percent of freshwater anglers fish for trout. 28 percent of freshwater anglers fish panfish. 27 percent of freshwater anglers catch catfish. 36% of freshwater fishing days are spent looking for bass. 92% of freshwater anglers fish in the state where they live. 23 percent of freshwater anglers fish out of state. Eighty-five percent of freshwater anglers fish in flat waters, including ponds, lakes and reservoirs. 44% of freshwater anglers fish in rivers and streams.

US anglers by age group:

Seventeen percent of 16- to 17-year-olds fish, accounting for 4 percent of all anglers. Thirteen percent of 18- to 24-year-olds fish, representing 9 percent of all anglers. 19% of 25- to 34-year-olds fish, representing 19% of all anglers. 21% of people aged 35 to 44 fish, accounting for 27% of all anglers. Seventeen percent of people aged 45 to 54 fish, accounting for 20 percent of all anglers. 16% of people aged 55 to 64 fish, accounting for 12% of all anglers. 8% of anglers over 65 and 9% of all anglers. From 1980 to 1995, fishing for 35- to 44-year-olds increased by 60 percent. This was the largest increase of any group.

Economic impact of fisheries:

Anglers spent $35.6 billion in 2001 on the sport. They spent $14.7 billion on fishing trips, $17 billion on equipment, and $4 billion on permits, stamp labels, land leases and titles, dues and donations, and magazines. 1 Assuming a ranking as a company, this revenue figure would place Game Fishing at number 32 on the 2002 Fortune 500 list of the largest US companies. The total economic output generated by freshwater fisheries exceeded US$74 billion in 2001, including impacts on retailers, suppliers of goods and services, retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers, and the indirect and induced impacts of these activities. Including saltwater fishing, the economic output is $116 billion. Anglers pay an average of $1,046 in fishing-related expenses. Freshwater fisheries spending in 2001 generated more than US$ 19.4 billion in wages. Including saltwater fishing, wages generated were $30.1 billion (a 23 percent increase since 1991). There are 683,892 full-time jobs due to freshwater fishing. Including saltwater fishing, the total exceeds 1 million (a 16 percent increase since 1991). US$ 2.07 billion was spent on fishing gear in 2001. Fishing gear ranks fourth in consumer spending on non-team sports equipment. Golf equipment topped the list, followed by sports equipment and hunting firearms. Florida anglers spend more than $4 billion annually on fishing and related equipment. Anglers in California and Texas spend more than $2 billion. In Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina and Wisconsin, anglers spent more than $1 billion.

Economic impact of fisheries:

U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Commerce Census Bureau. 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Related Recreational Activities. National Sporting Goods Association. Participated in sports in 2001. Future of Fishing project by Responsive Management, Harrisonburg, VA. American Sport Fishing Association. Demographic and economic impact of sport fishing in the United States, 2001. Participation and spending patterns among African American, Hispanic, and female hunters and anglers. Addendum to the 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Related Recreation. Addendum to the 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Game Hunting, and Wildlife-Related Recreation in the United States. 1980-1995 Participated in fishing, hunting and wildlife observation. National and regional demographic trends. Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration website, restowildlife.org.

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