How Long Should A 3-Month-Old Sleep At Night Without Eating 17 Reasons Why You Are Not Losing Weight

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17 Reasons Why You Are Not Losing Weight

1. You think you are eating healthy, but you are not. Does your diet contain a lot of “products”? Low carb or not, you want to eat real food. Diet sodas, noodle-shaped plates of pure fiber, and 1-gram net-carb “bread” aren’t Paleo eating plans. You’re just addicted and consuming empty calories – sounds familiar? Ignore the label to see if it’s true: this crap isn’t food and you shouldn’t be eating it. It’s not just low carb.

2. You are stressed out. The stress response system is subconscious; it responds to stimuli and nothing else. Emotional stress, physical stress, financial stress, relationship stress—I don’t even want to make these distinctions because the body doesn’t distinguish between sources of stress. They both cause the body to produce cortisol, a fight-or-flight hormone that breaks down muscle, worsens insulin resistance, and promotes fat storage. For 200,000 years, stress has meant life and death. It’s intense and infrequent, and the release of cortisol is alarming and extreme enough to improve the chances of survival. Today, our bodies respond to piles of papers in the same way. Traffic jams are like rival clans. A nagging boss is like a rampaging mastodon, only every day. Take a step back from your life and take stock of your stress levels—they might be holding you back.

3. You need to watch your carb intake. As always, carbs are key, especially if you need to lose weight. Moving towards the bottom of the curve, take care to avoid all processed foods (hidden sugar). You can also try without the fruit.

4. You’re building muscle. I always tell people not to get too hung up on the scale. These things are useful – don’t get me wrong – but they don’t tell the whole story, like whether you’re gaining lean mass. PB stimulates fat loss, but it also promotes muscle gain and better bone density. If you’re feeling fine but the scale doesn’t show any improvement, it’s likely that resistance training builds muscle and strengthens bones. You wouldn’t know this just from a bathroom scale. If you absolutely need an objective record of your progress, take a body fat percentage test (although these may not even tell the whole story) or try measuring your waist circumference.

5. You’re not active enough. Do you regularly exercise at a slow pace for three to five hours a week? Remember: Low-level (between 55-75% of your maximum heart rate) exercise nearly every day should be the cornerstone of your fitness regimen. It’s easy to do (because every bit of exercise counts) and it doesn’t deplete your glycogen stores (making it a pure fat burner, not a sugar burner). If you’re on the lower end of the spectrum, bump it up to five hours a week or more.

6. You’re sinking into chronic cardio. Of course, you can go too far with low-level exercise—you can start to get stuck in chronic cardio. When you stay above 75% of your maximum heart rate for extended periods of time, you are burning glycogen. Your body in turn craves more sugar to replace lost sugar, so you consume a bunch of carbs, preferably simple and fast-acting. You can continue down this path if you want–I did, for decades–but you’ll gain weight, lose muscle, release more cortisol, and damage any gains you may have made progress.

7. You haven’t tried IF yet. Results vary, but if you seem to have tried everything else, intermittent fasting may be a great way to break through weight loss plateaus. Make sure you’ve fully transitioned to the Paleo eating plan and start small. Skip breakfast and eat late lunch. If it feels ok, skip breakfast and lunch next time. Take your time and pay attention to your hunger. Finally, try exercising in a fasted state to maximize your metabolic advantage. If all goes well, your hunger won’t necessarily go away, but it will change. A successful IF can tame hunger, making it less persistent and demanding.

8. You eat too much. Low carb isn’t magic. It curbs extreme hunger and controls insulin, but calories still matter — especially if you’re near your ideal weight. In fact, those last few pounds usually don’t respond to the stuff that worked so well to get you to this point. Spoonfuls of nut butter and chunks of cheese may get you this far, regardless of the calorie content, but you have to tighten up if things aren’t working. That’s the real test, isn’t it? There are metabolic advantages to eating according to PB, but if you are not losing weight, something is going up – calories may need to be lowered.

9. You haven’t overcome bad habits and you haven’t developed good ones. Be brutally honest with yourself. Are you developing bad habits? If so, identify them. Make tentative, loose plans to get out of their grasp, and tell those around you. If you make it public, you will not be able to retreat without losing face. You also have to cultivate good. Follow roughly the same guidelines as breaking a bad habit—identify, plan, release—and you’ll be on the right track.

10. You haven’t cleaned out and optimized your pantry. out of sight, out of mind; out of reach, out of mouth. Get junk food out of your pantry, if not completely out of your house. Scroll down and throw away what doesn’t apply. As for the rest of your kitchen, check out some of the other Primal’s fridge interiors and grocery lists for inspiration.

11. You have achieved a healthy homeostasis. It could be that your body has reached its “ideal” weight – its effective genetic set point. Getting to this level is usually easy and effortless, but it doesn’t necessarily correspond to your desired level of slenderness. Women in particular tend to achieve healthy homeostasis at higher body fat levels. Breaking through plateaus may be hard enough, but plateaus determined by the body itself are nearly impossible. This may require careful adjustments in carbohydrates, calories, activity level, sleep and stress. If everything else is correct and taken into account, you may be looking for a healthy homeostasis. The question, then, becomes: Do you want to mess with something?

12. You have low willpower. Willpower is like a muscle. It must be used, or it will wither. You also have to fuel your will — starting with small victories. If you can’t muster the will to hit the gym, go for a walk. Note that willpower, or lack thereof, may actually be an indicator of what your body needs. If you really can’t bring up the will to go to the gym, it may be that your body needs recovery. In this case, overtraining is more dangerous than lack of will.

13. You always make excuses. If you find yourself having a few self-sufficient internal arguments throughout the day (which you lose), or (worse) lying about your diet and behavior, you probably have plenty of excuses too. Read this, maybe twice, and follow up on this.

14. You’re not actually in a pristine state yet! We regularly attract a large number of new readers, but not all of them immediately embrace the Primal concept. Yet they came back. They read archives and reviews. Something draws them closer and at the same time keeps them at a distance. why is that? What is stopping them? If this describes you, what are you waiting for? adventure. Use Primal for 30 days and see if you like it. I assure you; many enthusiastic community members are here because it works.

15. You don’t get enough sleep. Chronic sleep deprivation leads to the release of cortisol, our old friend in fat storage. (Fat burning, anabolic) The greatest peaks in plasma levels of growth hormone occur during deep sleep. A recent sleep study showed a link between lack of sleep and weight gain. Get seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

16. You don’t give it enough time. There’s no doubt that Primal Blueprint is a way to lose weight, but it’s not always a shortcut. Some people see immediate results by reducing their intake of carbohydrates, grains, sugar and vegetable oils, while others take a month to adapt before they begin to lose weight. Either way, it’s a way of life. In the long run, you are in it. Approach it with the right frame of mind and you won’t be discouraged.

17. You eat too much dairy. Some people just don’t respond well to dairy. We see this list time and time again in forums; for a lot of people, dairy just seems to be the main stagnation in fat loss. There are several speculative reasons for this. One, people from strict paleo backgrounds may not be comfortable with a more relaxed primal stance on dairy. Reintroducing any food into the diet after a period of restriction may have unintended consequences on body composition. Second, dairy has insulin-stimulating effects, which is why it’s a popular post-workout fueling tool for athletes. How many glasses of milk should a non-strength training PBer drink per day? Probably (definitely) not.

Why it’s rewarded: Sprints aren’t part of your fitness routine. I’ve found that many people think they’re getting everything they need out of their workouts by doing lots of low-level cardio and strength training a few times a week. Sprinting is often overlooked, but there’s a reason it’s one of the primordial blueprint laws. Nothing burns you out like a sprint. If you’ve never done sprinting or are extremely out of shape or overweight, I’d take it easy on sprinting. That said, there are a few things I recommend you learn about fitness abilities before jumping into a routine. But once you’re ready, do 6-8 all-out sprints (with short breaks in between) once a week to break the weight loss plateau when all else fails.

Ask Tanya via Skype, Email, Facetime or Phone. http://www.tanyaevans.com

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