How To Get My 10-Month-Old To Sleep Through The Night House Training Your Dog Fast

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House Training Your Dog Fast

When you bring home a new puppy, potty training is the most important thing you can do. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to do it quickly and efficiently.

After a puppy eats, drinks, plays, sleeps, or chews, he must go to the “potty” soon.

o Up to 6 months old, more than 12 times a day.

o More than 7 times a day from 6 to 12 months of age.

Take your dog out to defecate as often as possible each day. The more he was outside, the more it became ingrained in him that it was the right place for him to do business.

Always wear a leash when taking your dog to the potty. If you are using a crate, I highly recommend taking your puppy out of the crate, picking him up, putting him on a leash, and taking him outside. Put him on the grass in your designated area and repeat “go potty” over and over again.

There should be no excessive talking or playing. This is not play time or walk time. It’s potty time. Just stand in one place and let your pup use your 6ft leash wherever they want. But that’s all. Keep repeating his name and “go potty”.

After completing the task, reward your dog with a treat (there are always treats) and a “nice boy” or “nice girl.” Bring the dog back inside immediately.

If he doesn’t clear up within five minutes or so, put him back in the cage and try again in about 15 minutes. If he does go potty (both), go back indoors and take your puppy with you as you prepare for the day. Always keep him chained indoors. Keeping your dog on a leash at home can be helpful when potty training. It’s easier to find them when they’re hiding behind a chair or sofa, though your puppy should never be left unattended during potty training.

In the early days of a burglary, he was always picked up and carried outside. Don’t let him walk because he might squat and have an accident along the way.

Adjust feeding times and food amounts. I recommend feeding twice a day for puppies under 1 year old. Read the serving size on the bag.Divide daily servings in half and feed one before 7am and one in the evening

Leave dog food on the floor for no more than 10 minutes. If your dog doesn’t finish his food, grab the bowl and wait until the next scheduled time to feed. Going without food and water all day is setting your dog down. Allowing constant access to food will make it more difficult to predict when your dog will need to pee.

Watch your dog for signs that he needs to go outside. Tracking, sniffing, and circling are signs that a trip may be appropriate. Learn to recognize these signs and get your dog outside before it has an accident inside the house.

Feed your dog high-quality dog ​​food. Cheaper brands contain fillers and hard-to-digest chemicals, which can cause uneven stools and won’t hold up until he’s out the door. Even well-known national brands have ingredients that dogs can’t digest, like corn, chicken by-products, (head, foot feathers, beak,) wheat, sorghum, and other things I wouldn’t feed my dogs.

Do not feed “human food” to your dog as a steady diet. You can use it as an occasional training treat. A dog’s digestive system functions very differently than ours and will not provide the vitamins, minerals and enzymes your dog needs.

Don’t switch out dog food all at once. If you do change food, do it gradually, mix 75% old food with 25% new food for a week, mix 50% of each food for a week, then mix 75% new food with 25% old food Mix for a week and end up with 100% new food.

Note and record when your dog pees and urinates (i.e. after meals, playtime, or waking up from a nap) so you can develop a pattern and timeline for your puppy to follow. All dogs’ potty habits will be different.

I recommend using a crate when potty training. If your puppy is going to be alone all day, then a small fenced area is recommended. Use the chest day and night, especially when everyone is asleep.

Crate training should be done in short increments and gradually increased. Don’t force your dog into the crate, or he’ll see it as punishment. Never use a crate as punishment. Dogs love their crates, which become their own personal “den.” They feel safe and secure there. Your dog should see the crate as a good place.

To get your puppy used to his crate, remove the wire gate. Lure him into the crate with a treat. When he voluntarily enters the crate, give him a treat and say “good boy”. Then let him out of the crate on his own time.

Repeat this process several times. Then put the door back on the crate to lure your puppy into the crate again. Give him a treat, praise him, then close the door and wait five seconds. Open the door and invite your dog out. This is very important. Your dog has to wait until he is invited out. Gently stroke his chest, and then say “wait” on it. Repeat the process. Start with very short time increments and gradually increase the length of time in the bin.

Again, never force your dog into a crate, or he’ll see it as punishment. We want him to have a positive experience getting in and out of the cage. Put a toy and an old T-shirt or towel with your scent on it in the box. This will also communicate to your puppy that the crate is a good place. You’ll find that pretty soon your dog will automatically be in the crate without you even paying attention to him. Never leave a dog in a crate for long periods of time:

o No more than 2-3 hours if puppy is under 4 months old

o 4-5 hours for 4-6 months old

o 6-7 hours if puppy is 6-9 months old

These estimates vary by breed, dog size, and accomplishments to date.

If you work all day and plan to leave your puppy alone for a few hours before potty training, crating him may not be an option as that would be too long to be confined to a crate inside. Instead, consider a small area such as a bathroom, laundry room, or divide up a small section of any room you choose to limit your puppy’s space.

I recommend the adjustable pens sold at most pet stores. Heavy plastic types work best. Each section is two feet wide and usually has 8 knots. This allows you to increase the size of the enclosure as your dog grows. Size the pen so there is room for his blanket or bed at one end and a potty pad at the other end with little space in between.

The purpose is to make sure your dog hits the mat when he or she poops. If successful, gradually increase the size of the pen. Ultimately, you can give your dog larger and larger areas that allow him more freedom, just be sure to keep the potty pad within reach. Try placing the mat in front of the door you use most often to take your dog out. Give your dog a chew toy to pass the time he’s confined in the enclosure.

Constant supervision is crucial when puppies are not in a pen or cage. Always keep your puppy on a leash inside the house so he can’t walk around and potty without being noticed. This also helps the puppy get used to wearing the leash so he doesn’t get scared or afraid of it.

If your puppy starts squatting, quickly say “no” to pick him up, take him outside immediately, put him on a leash, put him on the grass, and say “go potty.” Give him time to refocus and squat down again. Say “potty” and “nice boy” or “nice girl”.

When the puppy is finished, treat and praise him. Bring the puppy directly inside the house. Allow 30-45 minutes of supervised free time outside the crate or pen. The puppy is then returned to the cage or pen for approximately 1 – 1 1/2 hours and the process repeated. If you need to leave the house, be sure to return the puppy to its crate or pen.

If your puppy finishes urinating or defecating in the house and you don’t notice his behavior, don’t discipline him. It is too late now. After a few seconds, he doesn’t know why you scolded him. No yelling, no nose rubbing, no hitting. You’ll confuse him and make things worse. Just clean it up and move on.

Be sure to clean with the right products to remove any odors your dog might want to return. Several are sold in pet stores. Make sure not to clean with anything that contains ammonia, as the smell of ammonia will attract the puppy back to that spot to repeat the show.

Teething can cause your puppy to make mistakes around the house. Discomfort in his mouth may trigger irregular urination. Be patient during this time – it will pass.

Before you go to bed at night, spend some time playing with your pup to burn off some energy. Take him out to the toilet one last time, then put him in a crate or pen overnight. You may want to put the crate in the bedroom so the puppy can see and hear you and feel like he’s still part of the pack. First thing in the morning, take him out of the cage or pen, pick up the puppy, and take him outside. During the first few weeks, the puppy may wake you up very early (4 or 5 am). As they grow, they sleep longer and are able to stay put longer.

Most importantly, be patient and consistent!

good luck!

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