What Is The Maximum Heart Rate For A 37-Year-Old Person Choosing a Trainer – 10 Things Your Trainer Won’t Say

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Choosing a Trainer – 10 Things Your Trainer Won’t Say

Choosing a trainer can be a daunting task. What are you looking for and what should you do to find a GOOD one? Where are the traps?

1. I Specialize in Marketing Myself as a Health Professional

Today, about 91% of health clubs offer it, and about 6.3 million Americans sign up for sessions. But this growth has fueled competition making trainers fight to stand out. The newest way: specialization. Trainers offer expertise in such areas as injury recovery, cardiac rehabilitation and diabetes. Demand has increased for trainers treating overweight clients especially those with diabetes according to the American Council on Exercise.

Not all so-called specialists are properly trained. You’ll find certification requirements for just a $500 fee and pass an online exam. John Buse, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association, says that when exercise is not done properly, any vision problems and nerve damage in the feet that some diabetics develop could worsen and in extreme cases, lead to blindness or amputation. .

2. I’ll Push You Till You Collapse

It’s not unusual to find a trainer overtraining a beginning client to prove how out of shape they are and need their services. It’s a sneaky ploy to get a bigger customer base. Considering that 37% of health club members are beginners, personal trainers mostly cater to the unfit. They also reach out to seniors, as customers 55 and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of gym goers. However, many trainers guide clients with a less than gentle hand. The majority of people who come into the club haven’t worked out since their high school gym. If you feel your coach is being too hard, speak up. Remember, you are the boss.

3. Caution: May Not Work Well With Children

One of the biggest trends in fitness today: enrolling youth athletes in a little one-on-one training. Concerned about their children’s weight and lack of physical activity, parents are turning to personal trainers at up to $60/hour. Seventeen percent of personal-training clients were between the ages of six and 17 in 2006; that is a 20% increase from 1998.

This niche is growing because approximately 15% of American children are overweight. But not all health clubs have trainers who work well with children or even know how to work them out safely. Even a good coach with the wrong attitude can turn impressionable kids off of exercise.

Hint: Be selective. Ask for a coach with a background in teaching, coaching or child development. If your child is involved in a particular sport, asking for a coach with a similar background can help develop specific muscles and prevent injuries.

4. Bring a Friend and You Pay Half Price

Fees for personal trainers can be quite steep. Sign up for a session with a superstar trainer and it could run you $400/hour. With most trainers, there is a way to save 30% to 50% if you know what to ask for. Over 70% of personal trainers offer group sessions at a discount.

Most health clubs usually won’t offer you the group option, but most personal trainers will work something out if you ask. After all, it’s a win-win situation. For a group of three the average fee of $60 per hour is cut in half for each client, while the trainer brings in about 50% more than he usually makes in an hour. It could also mean better training; There’s a lot to benefit from group camaraderie, as long as you don’t need a coach counting every rep you do.

5. If I let you use the equipment, you’ll realize you don’t need me

Does your trainer steer you away from the machines, making you do crunches with a medicine ball instead? Trainers are sometimes told not to spend too much time teaching clients how to use the equipment for fear that once they get comfortable, they’ll want to go it alone. Therefore, trainers might emphasize coordination exercises and rely on smaller props such as stability balls, resistance tubes or bands and balance tools, the three types of equipment most commonly used by trainers. This type of “functional training” helps prepare clients for popular recreational activities such as tennis and skiing, as well as basic movements such as bending over during household chores. But larger equipment also has its advantages; it can bring fast results in strength building and help maintain weight.

Ask potential coaches how they will help you. The best trainers serve clients by helping them become independent exercisers. It encourages trainers to demonstrate to clients that there is more to working out than using big machines, in part because of the benefits of functional training. They will offer a complete program designed with you in mind and will not require you to see them for further details.

6. I love to gossip about you

Some coaches share personal information about their clients. It can be as innocent as a trainer talking to another trainer within earshot of other clients. But with more health clubs requesting medical information they often make available to coaches, some clubs have had to decline the disclosure.

Some clubs do not have a company-wide code of ethics that coaches must adhere to. Unfortunately, the industry does not have the same federal regulation as, say, a psychiatrist who risks losing his license if he shares personal information. Before disclosing private health information to your health club, make sure it has a strict privacy policy. And think twice before pouring your heart out to your trainer.

7. I’m Just as Qualified as That Guy

The personal training industry has over 70 certification organizations. Some programs require a comprehensive understanding of human physiology, others require much less of their applicants. Standardized testing is lacking in the industry. Candidates can often take either a weekend course or an online exam before calling themselves personal trainers.

8. Being More Expensive Doesn’t Mean Better Training

Personal trainers charge more based on experience and requirement. Any fees you pay them are obviously an investment in your health. A more expensive trainer will not necessarily give better results. In the end, it’s about behavioral change. Finding someone who personally motivates you and who you click with is paramount and that person may not be a high-dollar seasoned veteran. If he can’t motivate you based on your personality style, you’re throwing money away.

To find the right trainer, request a trial training session before you hire one. Do a preliminary consultation that should not include exercise. Have an in-depth conversation about your personality and goals. Assess a prospective coach’s ability to produce results and ask for recommendations they have had.

9. When I Make It Big, I Go On My Own

The personal touch vaporized will only last as long as your trainer is still working at the same facility. I personally had three trainers in a little over a year. Why? The first quit to do a different profession that paid more and the second was promoted to manager at the other facility run by his gymnasium.

The personal-training industry has high rates of employee turnover. In addition to low wages, the flexible nature of the job attracts those who want to work part-time while pursuing other occupations that may eventually take them away from the profession. This can also result in what happened to me – canceled appointments due to their “other” work calling them away. It’s a good idea to ask about your prospective trainer’s intentions and long-term career goals, especially if you’re interested in purchasing a larger package of sessions.

10. I Have No Background In Nutrition But That Won’t Stop Me

Personal trainers have been pushing certain nutritional concepts for years, but now many are playing nutritionist with no background? Not only that, but if you are facing certain health issues, nutritional advice given by trainers can sometimes do more harm than good. Nutritional supplements, when mixed with medication and strenuous exercise, can result in injury or even death.

Before agreeing to change or supplement your diet according to a trainer’s recommendations, ask questions and inform your doctor. The best personal trainers will not compromise your health and will be willing to communicate with your doctor to find the best exercise plan for your needs.

Choose a trainer if you need professional help or motivation or read and learn what you need to learn and plan your own training routine. There are many books available. If you get stuck, see a trainer for a small number of sessions and ask for a specific training regimen you need.

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